What’s with the MLS laser?

What’s with the MLS laser?

What’s with the MLS laser?

MLS Laser Therapy

MLS Laser

Here at New Mexico Foot & Ankle Institute we continuously deal with painful conditions.  We see arthritis, tendonitis, nerve pain, sprained ankles, broken bones and lots and lots of deformities that limit activity levels for various reasons, but the #1 reason is pain.  With the 100’s of different problems we see there are still only a limited number of solutions.

Personally, I struggle occasionally with a pinched nerve in my left foot.  Despite my good orthotics and great collection of good shoes sometimes it still bothers me.  It came down to getting a steroid injection or using the MLS Laser on it.  I chose the MLS laser and it worked great for me.  So why chose the MLS laser over a steroid injection?  For me, the answer was as simple as the shot hurts and the laser doesn’t.

Low level lasers have been around for many years and studied extensively and shown to be effective in increasing blood flow to an injured area which in turned helped the healing.  Our MLS laser is short for a class IV multiwave locked system laser.  Additonally, te new MLS laser that we are now using is a high energy laser and overcomes the limitations that the older lasers had of not being able to treat conditions that were deeper down from the skin.  High energy lasers like the MLS laser have been shown to have analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-edema effects.  There is a lot of science behind how this works which is well beyond the scope of this discussion today.

The take home message is that the laser can be used to treat almost all of the painful conditions I see in clinic.  Similarly, it opens another door for us to offer more treatment options to patients who are looking for immediate relief of their pain and for safe and pain free ways to achieve that goal.  The laser worked well for my inflamed nerve and we’ve seen tremendous results with the laser on postoperative patients, slow healing wounds, tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, sprained ankles and many other conditions.  In brief, we are always striving to enhance our services to our patients by offering the best available treatments on the market and this is just another way we do this.

Don’t live life in pain, we now have another fantastic option for returning you to enjoy a pain free active lifestyle.

Call us today for an appointment at 505.880.1000. We take care of your feet…so that they’ll take care of you!

Nathan Ivey, DPM

#topdoctors   #bestABQfootdoctors   #nmfai   #wesavesoles #footdoctors   #podiatrist

 

Happy “Dogs” while Walking & Hiking

Happy “Dogs” while Walking & Hiking

Happy “Dogs” while Walking & Hiking

Walking and Hiking

Dr. Janet Simon

Dr. Janet Simon

With limited activities due to COVID emergency, many New Mexicans are hiking and exploring outdoor trails. We are obviously blessed with these opportunities to get out and enjoy the natural world. The term “dogs” has dual meaning here – 1) feet, often referred to as dogs in the early 20th century and 2) canines. While walking and hiking both “dogs” need to be prepared and protected from injuries and overuse.

As a podiatrist, I am often asked for recommendations on sock and footwear choices. Having properly fitting socks is important along with shoe/boot fit. Sock fit is often overlooked and from what I’ve recently observed on the trails sometime absent for a few newcomers to hiking. A synthetic blended sock is recommended over 100% cotton and I advise individuals that the thickness is a personal choice. Obviously, when purchasing new shoes/boots try them on with the thickness of sock you’re planning on using.

Shoe/boot choices are dependent on the type of walking/hiking. My observations on the Sandia trails are that experienced participants have “proper” shoes and the less experienced have footwear that I know will be bringing them soon into my office for foot problems. I’m not totally opposed to walking sandals on paved trails but do not feel they’re appropriate on rocky, cactus laden trails. Using a boot that provides increased ankle support will be beneficial especially if you’ve had history of ankle sprains, posterior tibialis tendonitis or overpronation.

Not only are humans out on the trails but their dogs too and it’s clear that many dog owners have not given much thought about their dogs paws or other wellness concerns on the trails. Recently, I’ve witnessed many small dogs being carried on trails that clearly were not appropriate for them to be on. Furthermore, their paws need to be conditioned for longer distances, as well as, their joints and muscles too.

Dogs do feel pain and unlike humans cannot complain vocally. Similarly, to what was stated about matching up the type of footwear to the difficulty or type of trail, matching up your dog is wise too along with providing booties or applying Musher’s wax to their paws. Dog’s “dogs” need protection too.

Additional advice that veterinarians share is making sure your dog is current on their vaccinations and well hydrated and nourished. Our Sandia trails require dogs to be leashed and I will opine that this is not only safety for others but also for your dog to stay on the trail and hopefully away from cacti.

Summing up – being safe during your walks/hikes is the message for both you and your “dogs”. My office is open and if concerns arise about human feet/ankles please call. We can see you in person or schedule a virtual visit. If your dog is having paw or other problems, please contact a veterinarian.

Don’t Live Life in Pain! Call us today for an appointment at 505.880.1000. We take care of your feet…so that they’ll take care of you!

Janet Simon, DPM

 

#westandopen #topdoctors #bestABQfootdoctors #nmfai #wesavesoles #footdoctors #podiatrist

 

The Coronavirus & Podiatry

The Coronavirus & Podiatry

The Coronavirus & Podiatry

COVID 19

The Coronavirus & Podiatry

I would like to spend a few minutes clarifying how the Coronavirus, aka Covid19, is affecting the private podiatry practice in New Mexico. Healthcare has been deemed an essential service and has remained open but we have changed who we are seeing and in some cases how we are seeing them. People who have foot issues that can wait have been asked to stay home.

Many of our patients are high risk and skipping a visit could result in an infection or even an amputation. Our goal is to make sure we keep the pressure off the hospitals and to keep people from having to go to the ER or even worse needing to be admitted to the hospital. As we continue to flatten the curve and lessen the stress on the hospitals it becomes more essential that people who have been putting off care of their feet and ankles come in to be seen.

We now know that the healthcare system in New Mexico will not have an overwhelming surge as we initially thought. Our responsibility is to keep our patients safe. Furthermore, we see infections or possible infections in our clinic daily and have always followed protocols and procedures to make sure we don’t pass those germs from patient to patient. Additionally, we have many patients who are elderly or who have multiple medical problems that puts them at high risk for infections.

Each patient is treated as someone who may be carrying a potential cold or flu and we continue to follow strict safety protocols. We have increased this significantly by making sure our waiting room does not break any social distancing rules and our staff screen patients for potential infections. Our goal is a safe environment for anyone to come to our office to be seen so that everyone with foot and ankle issues can be treated safely.

For those times where we can adequately treat via telemedicine we offer that as well. We rely heavily upon physical exam so we will continue to need to see patients in person more than not. Even being stuck at home it can be miserable to have pain and limitations in activity. In order to keep ourselves and our immune systems healthy we need to exercise, even if it is to go for a short walk.

We will continue to provide these essential treatments to anyone in need and we know that fear of infection keeps many people from seeking necessary care. Our commitment is that we will provide that care in a safe and caring environment. Delay in treatment more times than not will result in worsening of the problem and in some cases make it much more difficult to treat or cure. If you have pain or problems with your feet and ankles please call and either make an appointment or be screened to determine if you need to come in. Let us help you get back to a healthy active lifestyle.

Don’t Live Life in Pain! Call us today for an appointment at 505.880.1000. We take care of your feet…so that they’ll take care of you!

Nathan Ivey, DPM

#westandopen #topdoctors #bestABQfootdoctors #nmfai #wesavesoles #footdoctors #podiatrist #coronavirus #covid19

Do I have high or low arches? Does it matter?

Do I have high or low arches? Does it matter?

Do I have high or low arches? Does it matter?

People have a wide variety of foot sizes, shapes, types and deformities. Mr. Roger’s of Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood taught that each child is special and everyone is different in the world. This is also true of the foot.  Thankfully, no matter what the foot type you have, the function stays the same. With every step, your foot goes through subtle, yet very complex movements to do one of two things: #1) absorb shock, or #2) stiffen up to balance or push off. When people have pain, it’s usually because one or the other is not working right.

From looking at the foot from the side, there are three general foot types: high arch, normal, and flatfoot. Most people do actually have more of a normal arch but that does not mean they are pain or problem free. Normal arched patients can have all the same ailments as the rest of the other foot types. However, the low and high arch foot types have several problems that are more unique to each.

In flatfoot deformity, the bony structure is good at shock absorption. However, it has a more difficult time staying stable and strong as a “rigid lever” to push off. Frequently the tendons on the inside of the ankle start to hurt trying to keep the arch up and patients get pains as the arch flattens out. The legs tend to fatigue quickly as well.

For high arches, the foot has a tough time aligning the bones for proper cushioning. Hammertoes quickly develop and sometimes these feet frequently sprain because the front of the foot points inward more, causing the ankle to turn.  In severe cases, it can even be a sign of progressive neurological problems.

No matter what the foot type, shape, or size the NMFAI can help alleviate your pain, even on day one.

Don’t Live Life in Pain! Call us today for an appointment at 505.880.1000. We take care of your feet…so that they’ll take care of you!

Justin Ward, DPM

Half Marathon: Race Day

Half Marathon: Race Day

Half Marathon: Race Day

There is much to consider with race day assuming you have sufficiently prepared for the race.  How much rest do you need? What is your cloths strategy? What do you eat pre-race, night before and morning of? The answers to all these questions can make or break your day.

Ideally you will have a good night rest for the 2 nights prior to the race as there is a study that shows the rest you feel more from 2 days prior than the night before.  Most races will start at dawn, which means you are getting ready in the dark and usually colder than when you finish.  Have a good plan to stay warm prior to race.  Eating is a little tricky just don’t venture outside your previous diet, you don’t want to lose time because your running to the port-a-potty.  The make-up of your pre-race breakfast should include simple carbs, protein and a little fat (so it tastes good). This will give your body access to immediate energy as well as stored energy from the protein and fat.  More importantly drink plenty of water the day before and the morning of, simple rule of thumb is the same number oz of water as kg you are heavy per day.

My experience this last month was less than ideal, let me tell you what I did so you can avoid struggling through a long race.  I drove 6 hours the day before and ate travel food.  When I got to Moab I decided to camp, that’s what you do in Moab right?  Wrong.  Camping does not compute to a good night rest especially if you forget a pillow.  I also ate hard boiled eggs and wheat thins for breakfast, not bad but not great.  The only thing I got right was drinking enough water.  After all of that I was feeling pretty good through mile 6 but at mile 8 I started slowing down and really struggled to finish the rest of the race.  The good news is I finished without injury and I have the medal to prove it.

If you are already a runner or are thinking about starting it’s good idea to get a foot/ankle checkup.  Call us today for an appointment at 505.880.1000.  We take care of your feet…so that they’ll take care of you!

Mark Tenny, DPM

#topdoctors #bestABQfootdoctors #nmfai #wesavesoles #fifteenyearsstrong

Half Marathon: Preparation

Half Marathon: Preparation

Half Marathon: Preparation

Training for and running a long road race takes dedication and recently I began this endeavor.  The training period I chose was 12 weeks to get my endurance up to 13.1 miles.  Throughout the process there were a number of challenges that made my training less than optimal but, in the end, I was ready enough.

The first thing when you begin something like this is the time it takes to train.  Going on long runs requires time, which means sometimes you are running at odd times or your family is sacrificing their time for you to do your run.  I had several night runs outside in cold weather or long runs on the treadmill.  The next thing to worry about is the health of your feet. Shoes are of utmost importance when running a long race and remember all running shoes have a mileage limit, like a tire, and once you have hit that, usually around 400 miles, the shoe no longer gives you the support needed.  I also use custom orthotics in my running shoes for more support because I have high arches and need the support.  With all that support I still had to deal with blisters and calluses throughout the 12 weeks of training.

If you are thinking about running a long race make the right preparations for success.  Find a good training plan so you know you can run that far.  Research shoes and find the right one for you, which will depend on your foot type. Be ready for blisters because you will get them!

If you are already a runner or are thinking about starting it’s good idea to get a foot/ankle checkup.  Call us today for an appointment at 505.880.1000.  We take care of your feet…so that they’ll take care of you!

Mark Tenny, DPM

#topdoctors #bestABQfootdoctors #nmfai #wesavesoles #fifteenyearsstrong

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