Happy “Dogs” while Walking & Hiking

Happy “Dogs” while Walking & Hiking

Happy “Dogs” while Walking & Hiking

Walking and Hiking

Dr. Janet Simon

Dr. Janet Simon

With limited activities due to COVID emergency, many New Mexicans are hiking and exploring outdoor trails. We are obviously blessed with these opportunities to get out and enjoy the natural world. The term “dogs” has dual meaning here – 1) feet, often referred to as dogs in the early 20th century and 2) canines. While walking and hiking both “dogs” need to be prepared and protected from injuries and overuse.

As a podiatrist, I am often asked for recommendations on sock and footwear choices. Having properly fitting socks is important along with shoe/boot fit. Sock fit is often overlooked and from what I’ve recently observed on the trails sometime absent for a few newcomers to hiking. A synthetic blended sock is recommended over 100% cotton and I advise individuals that the thickness is a personal choice. Obviously, when purchasing new shoes/boots try them on with the thickness of sock you’re planning on using.

Shoe/boot choices are dependent on the type of walking/hiking. My observations on the Sandia trails are that experienced participants have “proper” shoes and the less experienced have footwear that I know will be bringing them soon into my office for foot problems. I’m not totally opposed to walking sandals on paved trails but do not feel they’re appropriate on rocky, cactus laden trails. Using a boot that provides increased ankle support will be beneficial especially if you’ve had history of ankle sprains, posterior tibialis tendonitis or overpronation.

Not only are humans out on the trails but their dogs too and it’s clear that many dog owners have not given much thought about their dogs paws or other wellness concerns on the trails. Recently, I’ve witnessed many small dogs being carried on trails that clearly were not appropriate for them to be on. Furthermore, their paws need to be conditioned for longer distances, as well as, their joints and muscles too.

Dogs do feel pain and unlike humans cannot complain vocally. Similarly, to what was stated about matching up the type of footwear to the difficulty or type of trail, matching up your dog is wise too along with providing booties or applying Musher’s wax to their paws. Dog’s “dogs” need protection too.

Additional advice that veterinarians share is making sure your dog is current on their vaccinations and well hydrated and nourished. Our Sandia trails require dogs to be leashed and I will opine that this is not only safety for others but also for your dog to stay on the trail and hopefully away from cacti.

Summing up – being safe during your walks/hikes is the message for both you and your “dogs”. My office is open and if concerns arise about human feet/ankles please call. We can see you in person or schedule a virtual visit. If your dog is having paw or other problems, please contact a veterinarian.

Don’t Live Life in Pain! Call us today for an appointment at 505.880.1000. We take care of your feet…so that they’ll take care of you!

Janet Simon, DPM

 

#westandopen #topdoctors #bestABQfootdoctors #nmfai #wesavesoles #footdoctors #podiatrist

 

Lisfranc

Lisfranc

Lisfranc

As football season begins again and we are exposed to the reasons we like to watch and for some why we like to play.  I am reminded of a little known injury that is very easily missed by ER physician, Orthopedist and Podiatrist alike, maybe because it’s named after a French gynecologist (Jacques Lisfranc de St Martin).  Lisfranc is a ligament that helps to stabilize your 1st Metatarsal.  It runs between two bones, the Medial Cuneiform and the 2nd metatarsal.  The disruption of this ligament can cause major instability in the foot.

I gave myself a review in lisfranc injuries after the opening game of the college football season 2 years ago.  Our starting quarterback sufferer this injury in the 2nd quarter, but it was missed by the medical staff and he continued to play until he kept complaining of pain causing the staff to review their initial exam to find he had suffered a lisfranc injury.  These injuries usually happen when you step in a hole or you miss a step.  In the case of our starting quarterback, he slowed down too fast on the turf.

These injuries can be devastating to the biomechanics of the foot.  If diagnosed properly and treated surgically, whether you are a professional athlete or weekend warrior, you can make a full recovery.  You will end up with some screws and pins in your foot but they are for the best and will aid in your recovery.  That quarterback is now a backup in the NFL, and we won the game in dramatic fashion.

Don’t Live Life in Pain! Call us today for an appointment at 505.880.1000. We take care of your feet…so that they’ll take care of you!

Mark Tenny, DPM

#topdoctors #bestABQfootdoctors #nmfai #wesavesoles #fifteenyearsstrong

Football injuries

Football injuries

Football injuries

Football season is upon us and there are no shortages of commercials to force this into our minds. What you might not know, is that in the NFL, the total number of annual injuries has increased from 2,500 to 4,000 from 2004 to 2011 seasons. Despite our advancement in protective gear and the recent limelight on concussions, footballers are getting injured more frequently than ever before in this violent sport.

Last NFL season, Peyton Manning as well as Drew Brees had at least partial tears of their plantar fascia. Thankfully, it did not put them completely out, but there were significant changes in the way they had to play and time off of the field.  Plantar fasciitis can frequently have a slow onset, but tearing usually has a single moment of sheering pain in the arch. If a player has difficulty bearing weight, they should stop their sport and be evaluated, especially to rule out a more serious injury.

Thankfully, there is hope for proper healing and fast recoveries with the right treatment. At New Mexico Foot & Ankle Institute, we pride ourselves on taking care of athletes, young and old.

Don’t Live Life in Pain! Call us today for an appointment at 505.880.1000. We take care of your feet…so that they’ll take care of you!

Justin Ward, DPM

Sports for Kids and Avoiding Injuries

Sports for Kids and Avoiding Injuries

Sports for Kids and Avoiding Injuries

Doctors are seeing more and more injuries in kids due to overuse. Overuse injuries are more gradual and are caused from a repetitive activity that does not allow the body enough time to heal between playing. In general, these types of injuries are more common because children today are frequently able to do their sport year around, where as decades ago, children usually played multiple sports that followed the seasons and weather.

Common injures in the foot and ankle:

  1. Pediatric heel pain (juvenile calcaneal apophysitis or “Sever’s disease) – the growth plate in the heel bone is injured
  2. Stress fractures – bones are breaking on a more microscopic scale
  3. Sprains and strains – muscles, tendons, and ligaments may be weakened or even torn

Treatment:

Early treatment is best. We at the New Mexico Foot and Ankle Institute can provide expert, individualized treatment plans.

Prevention:

In general, have your child do multiple sports, don’t be on multiple teams for the same sport, gradually have your child increase in activity (practice before season starts) and always take a stretching break after 10-15 minutes of light sport.

Don’t Live Life in Pain! Call us today for an appointment at 505.880.1000. We take care of your feet…so that they’ll take care of you!

Justin Ward, DPM

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